Intermountain West Climate Dashboard

The Intermountain West Climate Dashboard provides situational awareness of climate, drought, and water resources for Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.

Click the question mark icon above each graphic to see the description of that graphic.

Weekly or monthly summaries of evolving climate, drought, and water conditions for the Intermountain West are also available from these providers:
Colorado Climate Center/NIDIS Intermountain West Drought Status Briefings 
NOAA CBRFC Water Supply Briefings for the Colorado River Basin and Great Basin - monthly, January through May
NRCS Water Supply Outlook Reports for ColoradoUtah, and Wyoming - monthly, January through May/June

View the latest briefing

Temperature, Precipitation and Snowpack

30-day Temp. Anomaly
(HPRCC)

( updated daily )

30-day Precip as % Avg
(HPRCC)

( updated daily )

Water-Year Precip as % Avg
(HPRCC)

( updated daily )

Drought Conditions

US Drought Monitor
(NDMC)

( updated weekly )

Westwide and State Drought Monitors
(NDMC) Wyoming

( updated weekly )

Westwide and State Drought Monitors
(NDMC) Utah

( updated weekly )

Westwide and State Drought Monitors
(NDMC) Colorado

( updated weekly )

Standardized Precip Index (SPI)
(HPRCC)

( updated daily )

1-mo

Standardized Precip Index (SPI)
(HPRCC)

( updated daily )

3-mo

Standardized Precip Index (SPI)
(NDMC)

( updated daily )

12-mo

Evaporative Demand Drought Index (EDDI)
(EDDI)

( updated daily )

2-wk

Evaporative Demand Drought Index (EDDI)
(EDDI)

( updated daily )

4-wk

Evaporative Demand Drought Index (EDDI)
(EDDI)

( updated daily )

3-mo

Evaporative Demand Drought Index (EDDI)
(EDDI)

( updated daily )

6-mo

Current Streamflow, Forecasted Streamflow

Current Streamflow - CO
(USGS) Colorado

( updated daily )

Current Streamflow - UT
(USGS) Utah

( updated daily )

Current Streamflow - WY
(USGS) Wyoming

( updated daily )

Streamflow (last 4 weeks)
(USGS)

( updated daily )

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Key to images above

Soil Moisture

Reservoir Storage

Upper Colorado Reservoirs
(Reclamation)

( updated daily )

Wasatch Front Reservoirs
(Reclamation)

( updated daily )

Uinta Basin Reservoirs
(Reclamation)

( updated daily )

Upper Green River Basin Reservoirs
(Reclamation)

( updated daily )

Gunnison River Basin Reservoirs
(Reclamation)

( updated daily )

San Juan River Basin Reservoirs
(Reclamation)

( updated daily )

Precipitation Forecast

7-Day Precipitation Forecast
(NOAA WPC)

( updated daily )

Seasonal Climate Outlooks

One-Month Precipitation Outlook
(NOAA CPC)

( updated biweekly )

Three-Month Precipitation Outlook
(NOAA CPC)

( updated monthly )

One-Month Temperature Outlook
(NOAA CPC)

( updated biweekly )

Three-Month Temperature Outlook
(NOAA CPC)

( updated monthly )

Seasonal Drought Outlook
(NOAA WPC)

( updated monthly )

ENSO Conditions and Forecasts

ENSO Prediction Plume
(IRI)

( updated monthly )

Probabilistic ENSO forecast
(IRI)

( updated monthly )

Latest Briefing

December 3, 2021 (CO, UT, WY)

  • November was warm and dry across the Intermountain West with some locations observing record heat and no precipitation. After a snowy October, November produced little snow and regional snowpack is much below normal with many sites breaking low precipitation records. Despite wetter conditions in July – October, streamflow in some regional rivers remains very low, especially in southern Utah and southwestern Colorado. Drought now covers 97% of the region; exceptional drought eased in Utah, but extreme drought expanded in northeastern Colorado and southeastern Wyoming. A La Niña advisory is in effect and La Niña conditions are expected to persist through winter. NOAA seasonal forecasts reflect a La Niña with an increased probability of above average precipitation in western Wyoming and an increased probability of above average temperatures and below average precipitation for southern Colorado and southern Utah.

 

  • In contrast to October, below average precipitation fell across the entire region during November. Less than 50% of normal precipitation was observed in Utah, most of Colorado and northern Wyoming. Large areas of southern Utah and Colorado received less than 25% of typical November precipitation. November precipitation was slightly higher (50-70% of normal) in parts of Wyoming and northern Colorado. 
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  • Regional temperatures were much above normal during November. Temperatures throughout nearly all of Colorado and Utah were 4 to 6 degrees above normal. Temperatures in Wyoming and northern Colorado were mostly 6 to 8 degrees above normal and central Wyoming observed temperatures more than 10 degrees above normal.
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  • After above normal snowfall during October, warm temperatures and low precipitation during November produced little accumulating snowfall. Consequently, regional snowpack on December 1st was much below normal. Snowpack in central Wyoming, northern Colorado and Colorado east of the Continental Divide was between 60-70% of normal, but only 35% of normal in southwestern Colorado. In Utah, snowpack was generally less than 40% of normal except for the Uinta Mountains. Snowpack in Wyoming was mostly 50-60% of average. 
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  • Although streamflow has generally increased since during July, many important regional rivers continue to see much below average streamflow. Record low November streamflow was observed on the Dolores, Fremont, San Juan and Virgin Rivers. In Colorado, much below normal streamflow (<10th percentile) was observed on lower Arkansas, Roaring Fork and White Rivers. Much below normal streamflow was also observed on many Utah rivers including the Colorado (at Cisco), Duchesne, Logan, Price, San Rafael and Weber Rivers. Streamflow on Wyoming’s Snake and Wind Rivers was also much below normal during November. On a more optimistic note for future streamflow, soil moisture in Utah (from 139 sites including Snotel) continues to be much above average despite a warm and dry November.   
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  • Overall coverage of regional drought increased slightly during November and drought now covers 97% of the region. East of the Continental Divide in Colorado experienced the greatest expansion of drought, including the emergence of D1 and D2 drought in southern Colorado and the emergence of D3 drought in northeastern Colorado. Drought conditions in Utah generally remained the same throughout November, except for a contraction of an area of D4 drought in central Utah. An area of D3 drought emerged in southeastern Wyoming and D1 drought developed in central Wyoming.
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  • A La Niña advisory remained in place during November as east-central Pacific Ocean temperatures were nearly 1ºC below normal. Sea-surface temperature models predict an 80% probability of La Niña conditions continuing through winter and a 70% probability of ENSO neutral conditions prevailing by summer. The NOAA seasonal forecast for December indicates a 33% chance of above average precipitation for western Wyoming and northern Utah. There is an increased probability of above average temperatures for the entire region, especially in southern Colorado and southern Utah. Over winter (Dec-Feb), the NOAA seasonal forecast predicts a 33% probability of above average precipitation in western Wyoming and a 33% chance of below average precipitation in southern Colorado and southern Utah. Temperatures will likely be above average in Colorado and Utah during winter.
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  • Significant November weather event. Extremely warm and dry conditions covered the entire region during November. Looking at temperatures on a regional scale, November temperatures were mostly in the warmest 10% of years. However, looking at a finer resolution, 22 sites (with at least 50 years of data) across the region experienced the hottest November on record. As of November 21st, Denver, CO officially broke the record of latest first snowfall; Denver still awaits its first snowfall. In most of Utah, southern Colorado and northern Wyoming, November precipitation was in the lowest 10% of the historical record with many locations experiencing the driest November on record. Across the region, 34 sites observed the driest November on record with 30 of those sites receiving no precipitation. With an eye towards the upcoming water year, an examination of Snotel sites with at least 30 years of data reveals 27 sites in Utah and 5 sites in Colorado with the driest November on record. Six snotel sites recorded no precipitation during November.
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November 8, 2021 (CO, UT, WY)

  • The 2022 water year started well for much of the region. Large areas of Utah and Wyoming received much-above average precipitation and most areas above 8,000 feet have average to much-above average snowpack. Wet conditions caused a contraction of D3 and D4 drought in Utah and Wyoming, but drought conditions expanded in eastern Colorado and central Wyoming. La Niña conditions currently exist and are likely to continue through at least mid-winter. La Niña conditions typically increase the probability of above average precipitation in the northern part of the region and increase the probability of below average precipitation in the southern part of our region.
  • October precipitation was much-above normal in Utah and Wyoming; large areas of both states received greater than 150 – 400% of normal precipitation. Western Colorado received slightly above average precipitation, but most of eastern Colorado saw less than 50% of normal precipitation.
  • Temperatures were cooler than average in Utah with southern Utah temperatures up to 4 degrees below normal. Most of Colorado and Wyoming saw near-normal temperatures (+/- 2 degrees) except in eastern Colorado and Wyoming where temperatures were up to 4 degrees above normal. 
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  • Snowfall for most of the region was much-above normal during October. Much of the precipitation that fell in Utah, Wyoming and western Colorado fell as snow at elevations above 8,000 feet. Winter is off to a great start as all regional river basins have above average snow water equivalent (SWE) except for northern Wyoming, South Platte and Rio Grande River basins. While percent of normal figures can be a bit skewed in early and late winter, Utah river basins range from 100 – 800% normal SWE. SWE in Colorado and southern Wyoming ranges from 90 – 200% of normal. 
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  • Regional streamflow was higher in October compared to previous months with many rivers flowing at normal levels (25th to 75th percentile). Streamflow in several regional rivers still remains very low (<10th percentile), including the Snake, Yellowstone, White, Dolores, Bear, Logan, and Weber Rivers.
  • Moderate drought emerged in eastern Colorado and central Wyoming during October and now covers nearly 90% of the region. Extreme drought conditions expanded in northern Wyoming, but coverage of extreme and exceptional drought in Utah and western Colorado contracted during October. A small area of extreme drought developed in northeastern Colorado. Surface soil moisture conditions improved dramatically over large areas of Utah, Wyoming and northern Colorado.
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  • La Niña conditions currently exist in the eastern Pacific Ocean as sea-surface temperatures are -0.8ºC below normal. There is an 80% probability of La Niña conditions persisting through January and a 60% chance of La Niña continuing through March. The NOAA seasonal forecast projects an increased probability for above average precipitation in northern Utah and Wyoming during November and in Wyoming during November – January. The NOAA seasonal forecast for November projects an increased probability of above average temperatures for the entire region and the November – January seasonal forecast projects an increased probability of above average temperature for Utah and Colorado. 
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  • Significant October weather event. October precipitation was extremely high throughout much of Utah and Wyoming. Cities along the Wasatch Front, including Logan, Ogden, Provo and Salt Lake City observed the 3rd to 5th wettest October. In Wyoming, Lander observed the 3rd wettest October, and it was the 5th wettest October ever in Green River; in Lovell, Pinedale and Worland, October precipitation was in the top ten of all October observations. An important consequence of the wet October was a dramatic wetting of surface soil moisture conditions in Utah, Wyoming and northern Colorado. In northern and western Utah, many locations went from the driest on record to average and above average soil moisture conditions. Except for the Yellowstone Plateau, soil moisture conditions in Wyoming improved from near-record dry to much-above average wetness. Far northern Colorado also saw dramatic improvements to surface soil moisture conditions.
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