MPB Science Symposium:
Impacts on the Hydrologic Cycle and Water Quality

April 8, 2010 - Boulder, CO (NCAR Mesa Lab)

 

This WWA-sponsored symposium presented the findings from a dozen Mountain Pine Beetle (MPB)-water projects involving researchers at the University of Colorado, Colorado State University, Colorado School of Mines, the University of Arizona, the University of Wyoming, the University of Idaho, UCLA, US Forest Service, US Geological Survey, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The 50 participants in the meeting represented the above universities and agencies, as well as the US Bureau of Reclamation, the National Park Service, Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District, and Aurora Water.

Beetles, Water, and Climate Homepage

Agenda (PDF)

Participant List (PDF)

Presentation Abstracts (PDF)

Symposium Summary (PDF) - Feature Article in May 2010 Intermountain West Climate Summary

Presentations

(PDF available if title is linked; otherwise see Abstracts )

Introduction
Jeff Lukas and Eric Gordon, Western Water Assessment

Beetles and Water: Some Questions from Managers
Liz Schnackenberg (1) and Carl Chambers (2)
(1) Medicine Bow-Routt National Forest; (2) Arapaho & Roosevelt National Forest; USDA Forest Service, Region 2

The impact of the pine beetle infestation on snowpack accumulation and melt: Red Phase
Evan Pugh, University of Colorado-Boulder

Impacts of mountain pine beetle outbreak on distributed snowpack processes
Noah Molotch, University of Colorado-Boulder

Hydrological response to mountain pine bark beetle infestation in Western subalpine watersheds
Kelly Elder, USFS Rocky Mountain Research Station [presented by Rob Hubbard, USFS-RMRS]

Forest & watershed responses to beetle-related management
Chuck Rhoades, USFS Rocky Mountain Research Station

Response of evapotranspiration and greenhouse gas emissions to the bark beetle and blue stain fungus epidemic in Rocky Mountain forests
Holly Barnard, University of Colorado-Boulder

Impacts of beetle kill and wildland fire on regional water and energy cycles in western North America
Fei Chen, National Center for Atmospheric Research

Baseline information to help understand hydrological and hydrochemical responses to the mountain pine beetle outbreak, Como Creek watershed, CO
Ty Atkins, University of Colorado-Boulder

Effects of mountain pine beetle on water quality in the Upper Colorado River Basin
David Clow, United States Geological Survey

Preliminary investigations into the impact on hydrology and metal fluxes in mountain pine beetle infected watersheds: Summit County, Colorado
Kristen Mikkelson, Colorado School of Mines

Effects of the mountain pine beetle on water quality in Colorado mountain streams
Jimmy McCutchan, University of Colorado-Boulder

Water resource responses in beetle-killed catchments in north-central Colorado
John Stednick, Colorado State University

Quantifying the effects of large-scale vegetation change on coupled water, carbon, and nutrient cycles: Beetle kill in Western montane forest
Paul Brooks, University of Arizona