WWA External Advisory Board

 

Justin Derner

Justin DernerDr. Derner is the Research Leader for the Rangeland Resources Research Unit of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)-Agricultural Research Service (ARS). He leads a multi-disciplinary team of scientists developing and providing public and private land managers the necessary tools for properly managing semiarid rangelands for multiple ecosystem goods and services with extreme and variable weather. Dr. Derner received the Early Career Scientist of the Year Award for the Northern Plains Area of ARS in 2006, and multiple awards for outstanding science from the Society for Range Management. Dr. Derner is also a co-PI on the National Science Foundation funded Shortgrass Steppe Long-Term Ecological Research Project and is an affiliate faculty member in the Department of Renewable Resources at the University of Wyoming. He received his Ph.D. degree in Rangeland Ecology and Management from Texas A&M University.

James Ehleringer

James EhleringerDr. Ehleringer has spent his entire research and teaching career at the University of Utah, where he is currently a Distinguished Professor of Biology.  Prior to moving to Utah in 1977, he received his Ph.D. from Stanford University.  While at Utah, Dr. Ehleringer has developed a multi-disciplinary research and teaching program with a broad focus on ecology and the environment.  He has published almost 450 articles and served as mentor and advisor to more than 50 students and postdoctoral investigators. His research spans from global change impacts on natural and urban ecosystems through forensic science.  Dr. Ehleringer’s recent research projects include understanding the carbon cycle, investigating stable isotope variation in humans and in our foods, deciphering the basis of biomarkers in climate studies, and stable isotope applications to forensic issues.  Currently, he is the Director of Utah’s interdisciplinary Global Change and Sustainability Center (GCSC) and serves as a co-PI of Utah’s EPSCoR iUTAH Project. He is also the Director of the Stable Isotope Ratio Facility for Environmental Research.

Kathy Jacobs (Chair)

Kathy JacobsDr. Jacobs is the Director of the Center for Climate Adaptation Science and Solutions (CCASS) and professor in the Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science at the University of Arizona. From 2010 to 2013, she served as an assistant director in the U.S. Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in the Executive Office of the President, and was the director of the National Climate Assessment, leading a team of 300 authors and more than 1,000 contributors who wrote the Third NCA report. Prior to her work in the White House, she was the executive director of the Arizona Water Institute, leading the consortium of the three state universities focused on water-related research, education and technology transfer in support of water supply sustainability. She has more than 20 years of experience as a water manager for the Arizona's Department of Water Resources, including 14 years as director of the Tucson Active Management Area. Dr. Jacobs’ research interests include water policy, connecting science and decision making, stakeholder engagement, use of climate information for water management applications, climate change adaptation, and drought planning.

Richard Moss

Richard MossDr. Moss is a Senior Staff Scientist with the Pacific Northwest National Lab’s (PNNL) Joint Global Change Research Institute at the University of Maryland and a Visiting Senior Research Scientist at Maryland's Earth Systems Science Interdisciplinary Center. His research interests include development and use of scenarios, characterization and communication of uncertainty, and adaptation and vulnerability to climate change. He chairs the US National Academy of Science's standing committee on the "human dimensions" of global environmental change and serves on the editorial board of Climatic Change. Dr. Moss is active in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and served as a review editor for the Fifth Assessment Report. Previously, he served as Director of the Office of the US Global Change Research Program/Climate Change Science Program (2000-06), Head of Technical Support Unit for the IPCC impacts, adaptation, and mitigation working group (1993-99), and on the faculty of Princeton University (1989-91). He also served as Vice President/Managing Director for Climate Change at WWF and Senior Director for Energy and Climate at the U.N. Foundation.

Mark Shafer

Mark ShaferDr. Shafer is the Associate State Climatologist with the Oklahoma Climatological Survey (OCS) and Assistant Professor in the University of Oklahoma’s Department of Geography and Environmental Sustainability. He established and is the University of Oklahoma lead for the Southern Climate Impacts Planning Program (SCIPP), a NOAA RISA Team at The University of Oklahoma and Louisiana State University. Dr. Shafer was formerly Chair of the AMS Board on Societal Impacts and program co-chair for the Symposium on Policy and Socio-Economic Research. He serves on the NIDIS Implementation Team and was a coordinating lead author for the Great Plains Chapter of the 2013 National Climate Assessment. His research focuses on communication between the scientific community and policy makers, particularly in managing societal response to extreme events. Primary areas of research include the influence of scientific and technical information on policy outcomes and institutional factors that can affect the flow of information.

Amy Snover

Amy SnoverDr. Snover is an environmental chemist who serves as both Director of the Climate Impacts Group and Assistant Dean of Applied Research with the College of the Environment at the University of Washington. She works to improve society’s resilience to natural and human-caused fluctuations in climate by bridging the gap between science and decision-making. Working with a broad range of stakeholders, Dr. Snover helps develop science-based climate change planning and adaptation guidance, identify research priorities, and advise on strategies for building climate resilience. She has been recognized as a White House Champion of Change for Climate Education and Literacy, was a convening lead author for the Third US National Climate Assessment and lead author of the groundbreaking 2007 guidebook, Preparing for Climate Change: A Guidebook for Local, Regional, and State Governments, with over 3000 copies now in use worldwide. Her current areas of research include defining successful climate change adaptation, exploring the role of cities in adaptation and identifying the time of emergence of management-relevant aspects of climate change.